Psychotherapy
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  • Psychotherapy:
     

  • How long are the sessions?

    Sessions are generally 50 minutes long, but I may suggest a 75 or 100 minute session, if we both decided that this would be helpful.

     

  • What can I expect at the initial appointment?

    During the first session I hope to understand what your goals are for this therapy.  It can be helpful to know how you came to decide to seek therapy at this time and what you would like to resolve.  Please come with questions for me, if you have them. I welcome your reactions to me and to the things I say, as well. If we decide to proceed forward, knowing something about your family history, and current situation will enable a deeper dialogue between us.

  • How long will therapy take?

    Certain life problems lend themselves to short-term solutions and are resolvable within 10-12 meetings. 
    Some examples of such issues include:

    • Change of life transitions (example: how and when to intervene with an aging relative)
    • Decisions
    • Social anxiety
    • Change in problematic emotional reactivity
    • Acute bereavement due to a specific loss
    • Develop a plan for managing a chaotic family member
    • Assessing whether or not alcohol/drug use is problematic and what to do
    • Anxiety or depression triggered by a specific life event
       
  • Longer-term therapy (on-going or intermittent)
     
    Life problems that take longer to resolve are usually entrenched and involve more than one dimension.  They are a tangle of emotions and failed attempts that have led to a series of defeats, unconscious guilt and perhaps, even fear that things can only get worse by making changes. 

    In my experience, the key to resolving long term and complex issues is by teasing apart the threads of the tangle, so that each strand can be followed. Change can be accomplished with support and manageable steps. We often defeat ourselves by trying to change too much too quickly. Inevitable resistances and strong emotions arise in such a change process. In spite of this, with persistence, change occurs. It is often characterized by diminishment of fear, more interpersonal flexibility and increased ability to make use of other people to help us. 

    I make myself very available during times of emotional crisis, by phone, text, or in person to people in my practice working at this level.
     

  • Cancellation Policy:

    Please provide 48 hours notice.

 
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Copyright 2013 by Jane A. Dawson, M.A., LMFT (CA Lic. # LMFT13845).  All rights reserved.